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Ethnic differences in polyomavirus simian virus 40 seroprevalence among women in Houston, Texas

  • Connie Wong
    Affiliations
    Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Mail Stop BCM-385, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030, USA
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  • Author Footnotes
    c Present address: Global Pharmaceutical Research & Development, Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL 60064, USA.
    Regis A. Vilchez
    Footnotes
    c Present address: Global Pharmaceutical Research & Development, Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL 60064, USA.
    Affiliations
    Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Mail Stop BCM-385, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030, USA
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  • Jorge Quiroz
    Affiliations
    Department of Translational Sciences, Novartis Pharmaceutical Corporation, East Hanover, NJ 07936, USA
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  • Ervin Adam
    Affiliations
    Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Mail Stop BCM-385, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030, USA
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  • Janet S. Butel
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. Tel.: +1 7137983003.
    Affiliations
    Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Mail Stop BCM-385, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030, USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    c Present address: Global Pharmaceutical Research & Development, Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL 60064, USA.
Published:September 03, 2012DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jinf.2012.08.014

      Summary

      Objective

      To examine the prevalence and distribution among racial/ethnic groups of polyomavirus SV40 antibodies in women in Houston, Texas.

      Methods

      Women in three different cohorts reflecting the evolving demographics of Houston were evaluated for frequency of SV40 antibodies using a plaque-reduction neutralization assay.

      Results

      Women in cohort A (enrolled 1972–1973) were 68% (145/212) African-American and 32% Caucasian; the overall frequency of SV40 neutralizing antibodies was 7%. Women in cohort B (enrolled 1975–1977) were Caucasian with an overall frequency of SV40 neutralizing antibodies of 18% (37/211). Women in cohort C (enrolled 1993–1995) were 50% (199/400) African-American, 25% Caucasian, and 25% Hispanic; the overall frequency of SV40 neutralizing antibodies was 10%. Logistic regression analysis for cohort A showed no difference in SV40 neutralizing antibodies with respect to race/ethnicity, pregnancy status, number of previous pregnancies, or history of sexually transmitted diseases. For cohort C, race/ethnicity was identified as a significant factor associated with SV40 neutralizing antibodies, with Hispanics having a seroprevalence of 23% compared to 5–6% in the other two groups (p = 0.01).

      Conclusions

      A significantly higher SV40 seroprevalence was found among Hispanics than other racial/ethnic groups in the city of Houston. Findings are compatible with a model that certain population groups potentially exposed to SV40-contaminated oral poliovaccines have maintained cycles of SV40 infections.

      Keywords

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